LANSING, Mich. — Ingham County officials are planning to build a drainage system that they hope will solve pollution and flooding problems in the Red Cedar River and draw more people to Lansing’s business corridor.

The county drain commissioner, Pat Lindemann, is working to fill Ranney Park with a series of ponds linked by fountains, streams and waterfalls, the Lansing State Journal reported ( ). A concrete wall at the edge of the park will filter polluted water through a series of plants as it falls through several tiers like a fountain.

Lindemann said the parks will have trails and the ponds could be used for ice skating in the winter.

“Every neighborhood should have this,” Lindemann said. “Our greatest asset is water.”

The parks will also include privately funded murals and sculptures thanks to a partnership with Art in the Wild, an initiative of the Mid-Michigan Environmental Action Council.

“We’re creating a place that reminds us of what we care about most,” said Melody Angel, who chairs Art in the Wild and is Lindemann’s wife.

Although the benefits of the project would provide the community with drinkable water and less pollution, some of the surrounding property owners are concerned that their taxes will increase.

“I think (the project) has great validity, but no one knows what the cost is,” said developer Pat Gillespie of Gillespie Group.

Thirty-two acres of a former golf course nearby will go under a similar transformation. The Montgomery Drain project could cost as much as $30 million. Construction is expected to begin in the spring and could take two years to finish.

Information from: Lansing State Journal,