FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. — A Fort Campbell soldier accused along with five others of stealing Army equipment overseas was charged with attempted homicide earlier this year.

Police say 29-year-old Kyle Thomas Heade was charged in a shooting at a Bojangles restaurant in Clarksville, Tennessee, in January.

Heade fired into a car while two men were robbing a woman, The Tennessean reported ( One of the men in the car, Timothy Grant, was hit five times but he survived.

Heade’s attorney, Eric Yow, said in January he did not believe his client committed a crime in the January shooting.

“It appears to me, if he was the shooter, he was trying to protect someone,” Yow said at the time.

Heade posted a bond of $50,000 after it was reduced from $1 million in January.

Yow said Friday he has had no contact with Heade and was unaware of the federal indictment. According to Montgomery County court records, Heade has an arraignment scheduled for Monday on the January attempted homicide charge.

The other man in the car outside Bojangles, Dustin McCracken, tried to grab the money from the woman while in the car, according to police. McCracken was charged with robbery.

Heade was one of six soldiers and two civilians charged with conspiring to steal sensitive military equipment worth more than $1 million and selling it online. The federal indictment against them was unsealed this week.

According to police, Heade had been AWOL before he was arrested in January. He was taken into custody Friday in Oregon, said David Boling, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Tennessee. Heade is no longer a member of the Army, according to officials with Fort Campbell.

The military equipment was sold to buyers in the U.S., Russia, China, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Lithuania, Moldova, Malaysia, Romania and Mexico, among others, according to the indictment.

VIAThe Associated Press
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