Man gets 40 years in stabbing

Victim talks about aftermath

A Seymour man who pleaded guilty to breaking into a home and stabbing a pregnant woman two years ago will serve up to 40 years in prison for his crimes.

Justin D. Colvin recently was sentenced by Senior Judge William Vance in Jackson Circuit Court on a Level 2 felony charge of robbery resulting in serious bodily injury and an enhanced charge of being a habitual offender. He also has past convictions of criminal trespassing and possession of methamphetamine.

During the sentencing hearing, Colvin’s victim spoke about the physical, emotional and financial impact the incident had and continues to have on her to this day.

She had been at home asleep in the 100 block of West Brown Street in Seymour when the stabbing occurred in the early morning hours of Dec. 6, 2014, according to police records.

The victim, who was in her early 20s, was stabbed about six times, and the robber fled with some of her cash, police said.

She was around 16 weeks pregnant at the time, but the baby was not injured. The woman suffered wounds to her arms, head and right eye and was treated at Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis.

Colvin, who was 28 at the time, was arrested almost two weeks after the crime. He was tied to the attack after DNA evidence was found on the steak knife used in the attack that had been left at the scene. He also knew the victim’s boyfriend, police said.

In addition to the DNA, Colvin had a large scratch on his face that he received from the victim during the attack.

The victim said she originally had wanted the case to go to trial.

“It took a lot for me to realize it’s better this way because he could’ve gotten less out of a trial, but 40 years does not even come close to what he deserves because not only was that my life, it was my daughter’s,” she said of the plea agreement.

The woman said due to fear and her injuries, she was forced to move and couldn’t work for nine months. Her injuries left her partially blind in one eye due to nerve damage, forcing her to have to find a new job, she said.

“I struggle still today with the anxiety and (post traumatic stress disorder),” she said. “The time that everyone has to feel safe and at peace when they sleep I no longer have.”

She said she suffers from nightmares and is still afraid to go outside at night alone. But she credits her ability to fight off Colvin and make it out alive to her baby, who is now a year and a half old.

She said she hopes her story will give strength to other women who have suffered or are currently in a domestic violence situation.

“My life might have changed that day, but it didn’t end, which means I still need to move forward,” she said. “Today, I am a stronger person, and I will continue to rise above all the things that have happened to me. I will show everyone that just because something tragic happens, it isn’t the end, and giving up isn’t the answer.”

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January Rutherford is a reporter for The (Seymour) Tribune. She can be reached at jrutherford@tribtown.com or 812-523-7069.