TULSA, Okla. — The Latest on the manslaughter trial of a white Oklahoma police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man. (all times local):

12:40 p.m.

Attorneys for a white Oklahoma police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last year have rested their case.

Betty Jo Shelby’s attorneys rested around noon on Tuesday, clearing the way for closing arguments in the first-degree manslaughter case to begin Wednesday morning.

Earlier Tuesday, Tulsa County District Judge Doug Drummond refused a request by Shelby’s attorneys to declare a mistrial. Her attorneys argued that prosecutors implied Shelby was guilty because she waited several days to give an official statement about the Sept. 16 shooting.

Prosecutors argue that the Tulsa officer overreacted when she shot 40-year-old Terence Crutcher. Shelby’s attorneys have said Crutcher refused her commands to lie down during a two-minute period before police cameras recorded the shooting.

If convicted, Shelby faces four years to life in prison.


10:30 a.m.

An Oklahoma judge has refused to declare a mistrial in the manslaughter trial of a white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last year.

Attorneys for Tulsa officer Betty Jo Shelby sought the mistrial, saying prosecutors implied Shelby was guilty because she took several days to make an official statement about her actions during the Sept. 16 shooting.

Shelby has pleaded not guilty to first-degree manslaughter in the death of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher.

Tulsa County District Judge Doug Drummond denied the mistrial request Tuesday.

Prosecutors argue that Shelby overreacted when she shot Crutcher. Shelby’s attorneys have said Crutcher refused Shelby’s commands to lie down during a two-minute period before police cameras recorded the shooting.

If convicted, Shelby faces four years to life in prison.

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