Letter: Money nowadays is becoming invisible

To the editor:

Now about money.

Yes, that stuff that you hold in your hand, for a while. I know, it is going out of style. Money is becoming invisible. But not so in my days. The nickel was the main exchange rate. There was the nickel candy bar, the nickel Coke, the nickel ice cream cone, etc. If you were lucky enough to have a nickel you were set for the day.

Of course the value has changed but the physical money has also changed. The two dollar bill has long been gone and when did they discontinue the half dollar? It just faded away before we notice it. And the silver dollar … If you want one you will pay about $25 for it. Well, we still have some coins left.

Our Canadian friend’s dollar is called the “loonie” and very aptly so because it changes value daily. They think ours is crazy.

They ask, “Why is the dime worth more than the nickel when the nickel is larger than the dime?” I answer, “Well, ah, ah, well.” And why, they ask, do we still use the penny. What good is it? I answer, “Well, ah, ah well I guess…” “And why do we buy gas by the gallon when the rest of the world buys it by the liter?”

I get tired of their silly questions.

Speaking of buying gas. What about the price, say, $2.33.9? Have you ever tried to buy one gallon of gas and pay the point nine? I look through my change and can’t find a point nine coin. And then there is the price of something for $399.00. No no, not $400.00. I guess it just sounds cheaper.

When was the last time a clerk counted back our change? It would be rare. They just stack the bills up and lay the coins on top with “Have a nice day.”

Does anyone count it? I doubt it unless it is the woman in front of me in line who pays for a cartload by counting out change from her little coin purse. How she gets in front of me very time beats me.

This is what I mean about money becoming invisible; today when a person goes into McDonalds and orders a Coke they wave their gadget in front of another gadget and walk out sipping their Coke. Was it free? I didn’t see them pay for it. No wonder everybody is in debt. As for me I never had a lot of money in my lifetime but that doesn’t mean I’m not rich.

Don Hill

Seymour