RENO, Nev. — A day after beating back flames to prevent damage to dozens of rural homes, fire officials on Wednesday advised more residents to evacuate with their animals ahead of one of several blazes sweeping across hot, dry northern Nevada rangelands.

Palomino Valley residents were urged to voluntarily relocate to an equestrian events center in Reno, Truckee Meadows fire spokeswoman Erin Holland said in a statement.

Holland said 100 animals were sheltered, with room for more.

She didn’t immediately respond to telephone and email messages about how many people and homes were affected.

The area, south of Pyramid Lake, has about 200 homes, mostly on ranches.

“Houses are pretty spread out in this area,” Washoe County sheriff’s spokesman Bob Harmon said. “And most people have horses.”

The fire district advisory followed a National Weather Service warning for high fire danger in western Nevada and in California’s Alpine and Mono counties.

Earlier, firefighters battled flames that neared about a dozen homes late Tuesday and early Wednesday near Palomino Valley but burned only one shed, Truckee Meadows Fire Chief Charles Moore said.

“We’re stretched thin because we have so many fires going on all at once,” Moore said. “Wildfire is a natural disaster that happens with regularity. You can almost bank on it happening every summer.”

The number of firefighters battling the Palomino Valley fire grew from 250 to 300, aided by fire engines and air tanker drops. No injuries were reported.

Moore said the fire may have been started accidentally Tuesday afternoon. It spread to more than 4.5 square miles (11.7 square kilometers) in less than 24 hours and was consuming cheat grass, sage and pinion-juniper pine bushes.

Moore said a well-maintained landscape fire buffer helped protect the multi-billion dollar Apple Technology Center in Reno Technology Park east of Sparks.

Another fire that started Monday near Golden Eagle Regional Park in Sparks charred some 39 square miles (101 square kilometers) and temporarily closed Interstate 80 for a time on Tuesday as it crossed the freeway near the town of Patrick.

It was spreading south and east, away from populated areas, not far from a Tesla factory where the electric-car company manufactures lithium-ion batteries.

Meanwhile, a wildfire that started Monday near Wadsworth, between Fernley and Pyramid Lake, grew to more than 110 square miles (285 square kilometers) in an unpopulated area. Fire officials reported it was about 35 percent contained.

Gusty winds also were a concern at another fire that started Monday about 15 miles northeast of Lovelock. It grew by Wednesday to 17 square miles (44 square kilometers), and was 25 percent contained.

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