LANSING, Mich. — A public-private partnership has released its strategy for attempting to restore self-sustaining populations of the arctic grayling to Michigan waters.

The Michigan Arctic Grayling Initiative described its goals and plans for the next several years during a meeting last week of the state Natural Resources Commission in Lansing.

The initiative was founded by the state Department of Natural Resources and the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians. It now has 32 member organizations.

Michigan’s Lower Peninsula once was home to large numbers of Arctic grayling. But they died out in the early 20th century because of damage to stream habitat from logging of the state’s virgin forests.

The recovery plan includes research, management, fish production and outreach and education.

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Online: http://www.migrayling.org

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