MADISON, Wis. — Flood waters began to recede in the city of Burlington Friday as emergency officials turned their attention to restoring power, assessing damage and preserving a dam.

Wisconsin Emergency Management spokeswoman Lori Getter said the Fox River in Burlington, a city of 10,500 in Racine County, is expected to drop below flood stage by Wednesday. The city has started transitioning into recovery efforts, including gathering information door-to-door for damage estimates and finding places for debris.

People have started to return to their homes but Getter didn’t have any numbers on how many were displaced or how many have returned so far. About 4,000 homes were still without power as of early Friday afternoon, she said. We Energies has been hesitant to restore power to homes with water in their basements, Getter said.

Four city bridges spanning the Fox remained closed. Around 64 Wisconsin National Guard soldiers remained in the city to help keep the bridges closed and conduct welfare checks on residents.

The DNR has started monitoring a dam on Echo Lake that sustained what Getter called “a little bit of damage” during the flooding. The Racine Journal Times reported (http://bit.ly/2tUgfDx ) that a 1-inch opening was seen at the dam.

Police Chief Mark Anderson told the newspaper that the city plans to drain the 70-acre lake and open the dam in small increments. Getter said that should help alleviate pressure on the structure.

The Journal Times reported that a citywide curfew from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. will remain in place for a third night. A temporary ban on drones also was in effect from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. as authorities deployed their own drones to assess damage.

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