LINCOLN, Neb. — The Latest on Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts’ news conference on problems in the State Patrol: (all times local):

5:30 p.m.

An investigation has found that Nebraska State Patrol leaders didn’t properly investigate allegations of sexual harassment by a female recruit involving an outside doctor working on the patrol’s behalf.

The investigation released Thursday comes just two days after a female trooper filed a federal lawsuit alleging she was subjected to invasive and medically unnecessary pelvic exams by a doctor as a condition of employment.

The investigation found that patrol leaders didn’t properly document the woman’s allegations and didn’t follow up with her until more than two years after she had made them.

The patrol doesn’t have any formal sexual harassment policies for third parties who perform work on its behalf, but the investigation report says leaders should have exercised more independent judgment and investigated the issue.


5:25 p.m.

An investigation has found that Nebraska State Patrol leaders improperly tried to influence the outcome of a least four internal reviews and failed to disclose as many as a dozen cases where troopers were accused of misconduct.

The report released Thursday adds new detail to the review that led Gov. Pete Ricketts to fire former Nebraska State Patrol Superintendent Col. Brad Rice in June.

The report says Rice interfered in cases involving a trooper who struck an intoxicated man with a rifle butt; a trooper involved in a high-speed chase that killed a South Dakota man; a trooper and senior union official accused of lying; and a case against a trooper who bumped a fleeing vehicle without permission.


2 p.m.

Gov. Pete Ricketts is set to reveal more details about an investigation that led him to fire the Nebraska State Patrol’s superintendent.

Ricketts and the state’s human resources director will unveil the findings at a news conference Thursday at 4 p.m.

Ricketts announced in June that he had fired Col. Brad Rice and sent the investigation’s initial findings to the FBI and the U.S. attorney’s office. He declined to discuss in detail what was found.

Ricketts ordered the review after state patrol troopers were accused of changing their story about a high-speed chase that killed a South Dakota driver.

The patrol also faces a lawsuit alleging that that female recruits were forced to submit to invasive, medically unnecessary pelvic exams by a male doctor before the patrol would hire them.