ROCHESTER, Minn. — Some southeast Minnesota businesses are providing spaces for local musicians to flourish.

Noelle Tripolino Roberts and her husband opened 75-seat music venue Jive Mill in Rochester earlier this year, Minnesota Public Radio reported . She said they saw an opportunity in the lack of venues charging for shows.

“I think we were just blown away by the amount of creativity and artistry and music that was actually coming out of Rochester,” Tripolino Roberts said.

Zach Zurn recently opened Carpet Booth Studios. He said he immediately had requests for time in the recording studio after opening.

“Pretty much within the five to seven days of me announcing that I even existed, emails (started) flooding in, phone calls (started) flooding in,” he said.

Zurn said all of the changes in Rochester this summer have marked a change for the city’s arts community.

“This summer was foundational for the arts and music scene,” Zurn said.

Rochester-based concert promotion organization My Town, My Music has a subscription service that allows people to vote on the acts they wish to see in concert. Co-founder Dustin Hart said the company has found a strong hip-hop following in the city.

Maintaining a steady stream of concert-goers is another difficulty for musicians in the city, said Jerry Kvasnicka, a retired Mayo Clinic employee.

Kvasnicka said many of the medical professionals in the city are too tired to stay up late for a good show and residents often buy tickets last minute, which can make planning events difficult. The city’s professional medical culture also means some don’t want to let loose at a concert, he said.

“I know physicians who will go to First Avenue but don’t see music here,” Kvasnicka said.

The city’s unpredictable music scene caused a Mayo Civic Center concert scheduled for Saturday to be cancelled due to low ticket sales.


Information from: Minnesota Public Radio News, http://www.mprnews.org

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