JERSEY CITY, N.J. — Facts and figures for the 12th Presidents Cup matches:

Teams: United States against an International team of players from everywhere but Europe.

Dates: Sept. 28-Oct. 1.

Venue: Liberty National Golf Club.

Length: 7,328.

Par: 71.

Points needed to win: 15½.

Captains: Steve Stricker (U.S.) and Nick Price (International)

Defending champion: United States.

Series: United States leads, 9-1-1

Format: Nine matches of foursomes, nine matches of fourballs, 12 singles matches. Each is worth one point.

Last time: The Americans won for the sixth straight time in the tightest matches since the tie in South Africa in 2003. The International team rallied on the final day in South Korea and was on the verge of winning when Anirban Lahiri had 4 feet for birdie and Chris Kirk was 15 feet away. Kirk made his birdie and Lahiri missed, and the Americans picked up the decisive point in a 15½-14½ victory when Bill Haas, son of U.S. captain Jay Haas, held off Sangmoon Bae to win on the 18th hole.

International team: Jason Day, Branden Grace, Emiliano Grillo, Adam Hadwin, Si Woo Kim, Anirban Lahiri, Marc Leishman, Hideki Matsuyama, Louis Oosthuizen, Charl Schwartzel, Adam Scott, Jhonattan Vegas.

U.S. team: Daniel Berger, Kevin Chappell, Rickie Fowler, Charley Hoffman, Dustin Johnson, Kevin Kisner, Brooks Koepka, Matt Kuchar, Phil Mickelson, Patrick Reed, Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas.

Tale of the tape: The International team has six players in the top 30 in the world. Phil Mickelson at No. 30 is the lowest-ranked American player.

Key Statistic: Ten of the 24 players at Liberty National have never competed in the Presidents Cup.

Notable: Phil Mickelson has played in every Presidents Cup dating to the inaugural event in 1994.

Quotable: “I think the challenge will be a little overconfidence.” — U.S. captain Steve Stricker.

Television (all times EDT): Thursday, 1-6 p.m. (Golf Channel); Friday, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. (Golf Channel); Saturday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. (NBC); Sunday, Noon-6 p.m. (NBC).

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