MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The Latest on Alabama’s GOP primary (all times local):

8:50 p.m.

Incumbent Sen. Luther Strange wished jurist Roy Moore well after losing the Alabama Republican primary for Senate.

Strange told his supporters Tuesday night that “we wish (Moore) well going forward.”

But he quickly shifted to his own bewilderment at the race he just finished. “We’re dealing with a political environment that I’ve never had any experience with,” he said.

“I’m telling you, the political seas and winds in this country right now … are very hard to navigate, very hard to understand.”

Strange also thanked President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence for backing him.

Strange said Trump, may “be criticized” for coming to Alabama on his behalf. “Sometimes it’s just about friendship … a common goal to make the country better,” he said.


8:45 p.m.

A group that put millions of dollars behind Sen. Luther Strange in Alabama’s Senate race says it will now back Roy Moore.

Senate Leadership Fund President and CEO Steven Law said Tuesday that Moore won the nomination “fair and square.”

Law says Moore “has our support, as it is vital that we keep this seat in Republican hands.”

The group, which has ties to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, put millions of dollars behind Strange in the heated GOP primary with Moore.

Moore will face Democrat Doug Jones in December.


8:25 p.m.

Firebrand jurist Roy Moore has won the Alabama Republican primary for U.S. Senate, defeating an appointed incumbent backed by President Donald Trump and allies of Sen. Mitch McConnell.

In an upset likely to rock the party establishment, Moore clinched victory Tuesday over Sen. Luther Strange to win the GOP nomination for the Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Moore will face Democrat Doug Jones in a Dec. 12 special election.

Moore is the state’s former chief justice who was twice removed from his duties for defying federal courts over same-sex marriage and the public display of the Ten Commandments.

Propelled by evangelical voters, Moore consolidated support from a number of anti-establishment forces, including former White House strategist Steve Bannon.


8:10 p.m.

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange has yet to appear at his election night party where several dozen of his supporters are gathering to watch early returns showing Strange trailing Roy Moore in a U.S. Senate primary runoff.

Strange’s supporters were late arrivals to the suburban Birmingham hotel, and many are quietly watching returns and suggesting that Moore’s wide leads in many counties will be too much for Strange to overcome.

Strange is watching returns privately.

He was appointed to the seat earlier this year when Jeff Sessions won confirmation as the nation’s attorney general.

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7:55 p.m.

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore entered his election night party to applause from supporters optimistic that he will win the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate.

Moore smiled broadly Tuesday evening as he exchanged handshakes and hugs from supporters. He did not speak to the crowd.

He will watch returns in a room in another part of the building.

Moore is competing against incumbent Sen. Luther Strange for the nomination for Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat.

Former University of Alabama running back Siran Stacy, who is now a pastor, led the crowd in a prayer as they held their hands up in worship, and a hymn.

The crowd applauded as the first results showed Moore leading in rural counties.


7:05 p.m.

Polls have closed in Alabama’s Republican Senate primary runoff.

Voting ended 7 p.m. Tuesday in the race to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat.

U.S. Sen. Luther Strange and firebrand jurist Roy Moore are competing in the Alabama’s GOP primary that has pitted President Donald Trump against a former top adviser.

Trump is backing Strange. Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is supporting Moore. Moore’s campaign chairman said Bannon is expected to attend Moore’s election night party in Montgomery, Alabama.

The winner faces Democrat Doug Jones in December.


3:30 p.m.

Sen. Luther Strange is urging voters to get the polls in Alabama’s heated GOP runoff for the Senate seat.

“President Donald Trump needs you NOW!” the campaign wrote in a Tuesday message that was emailed to supporters at midday. The campaign urged people to get to the polls before they close at 7 p.m.

His campaign has emphasized his endorsement from Trump.

Strange voted early Tuesday morning in the race where he faces former state chief justice Roy Moore. Strange then greeted breakfast diners at nearby restaurants.


2:15 p.m.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says turnout for the state’s Republican runoff for U.S. Senate is so far looking pretty low.

Merrill said he was projecting a 12 to 15 percent turnout for Tuesday’s race.

Sen. Luther Strange and Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore are vying for the Republican nomination for the Senate seat that belonged to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Low turnout is largely considered to be positive for Moore, who has a loyal following among state evangelical voters.

Moore led Strange by about 25,000 votes in the crowded August primary, and runoff polls have shown him leading or in a dead heat with Strange.

Turnout for the August primary was 17 percent.


11:45 a.m.

Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore has cast his ballot after riding a horse to his rural polling place in northeastern Alabama.

Moore wore a short-sleeve shirt and a white cowboy hat Tuesday morning as he climbed off his mount outside the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department.

Accompanied by relatives, he chatted with fellow voters and marked his ballot in the tiny precinct.

Moore and appointed Sen. Luther Strange are vying for the U.S. Senate seat previously held by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Strange voted earlier in suburban Birmingham.

Moore says riding a horse to vote is an Election Day tradition for him. His house is near his polling place.


8 a.m.

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange is billing himself as the “true conservative” as voters go to the polls in the state’s special GOP primary runoff election.

Strange called a supportive conservative talk show on Birmingham’s WERC radio after voting Tuesday. He made a final plea for support in his race against former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore.

Moore is casting Strange as being part of the problem in Washington since he’s supported by the GOP establishment. But Strange denies that and says he’s only trying to get President Donald Trump’s agenda passed through Congress.

A super PAC aligned with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has pumped millions of dollars into the Alabama race on behalf of Strange. But Strange says he only met McConnell a few months ago and denies being close to him.

The winner of the Republican runoff will face Democratic nominee Doug Jones in the general election.


7:10 a.m.

Polls have opened in a special U.S. Senate election in Alabama where President Donald Trump is backing the establishment candidate to keep the seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Trump supported Sen. Luther Strange with a Tweet sent before voting began Tuesday morning.

Strange is being opposed by former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, known for publicly displaying the Ten Commandments and opposing gay marriage. Former Trump aide Steve Bannon spoke at a rally in support of Moore on Monday night.

Moore led Strange by about 25,000 votes in the crowded August primary. Runoff polls have shown him leading, or in a dead heat with, Strange, who is a former state attorney general.


6 a.m.

President Donald Trump is making a final push for Sen. Luther Strange in Alabama’s GOP primary.

Trump tweeted early Tuesday before voting began: “Luther Strange has been shooting up in the Alabama polls since my endorsement. Finish the job – vote for ‘Big Luther.'”

The Alabama primary is being closely watched to see how much political sway Trump still has in the populist, conservative movement that helped send him to the White House.

Strange, the establishment-backed incumbent, is locked in a tight race with former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. Moore is a jurist known for pushing unsuccessfully for the public display of the Ten Commandments and opposing gay marriage. He is backed by some of Trump’s most ardent supporters and has the support of Trump’s former aide Steve Bannon.


4:30 a.m.

U.S. Sen. Luther Strange and firebrand jurist Roy Moore face off in Alabama’s GOP primary that has pitted President Donald Trump against a former top adviser.

Vice President Mike Pence campaigned for Strange in Alabama ahead of Tuesday’s runoff. Trump’s former strategist Steve Bannon endorsed Moore, arguing he’s a better fit for the “populist, nationalist, conservative movement.”

The two Republicans are vying for Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat. The winner will face Democrat Doug Jones in December.

Strange, the state’s former attorney general, was appointed to the seat in February. Moore is the state’s former chief justice. He was twice ousted from those duties over stands against gay marriage and for the public display of the Ten Commandments.