MADISON, Wis. — The Latest on a bill that would relax juvenile criminal record confidentiality for students (all times local):

3 p.m.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos isn’t saying whether a bill allowing teachers to demand student suspensions and require principals to report violent students to police will get a floor vote.

Vos told reporters Thursday that he supports letting teachers protect themselves and their students but his caucus hasn’t discussed the specifics of Rep. Jeremy Thiesfeldt’s proposal. Vos says legislators should look at student discipline but he hasn’t read the bill’s specifics and doesn’t know whether the measure is the “exact right solution.”

Under the bill, police would have to notify schools when they take a student into custody for a violent crime before the next school day begins. School administrators would have to notify the student’s teachers as soon as possible.

Teachers could ask school boards to suspend students if administrators won’t do it. They would have the right to inspect a student’s behavioral records and end their contracts without penalty if students attack them. Administrators would have to report any violent incident perpetrated by a student to police.


9:25 a.m.

The author of a bill that would relax juvenile criminal record confidentiality for students and allow teachers to pursue student suspensions is trying to head off criticism in front of a legislative committee.

Republican Rep. Jeremy Thiesfeldt told the Assembly Judiciary Committee during a hearing Thursday that discipline in schools is slipping because administrators are trying to follow a failed social justice agenda. He says students need consequences.

Under the bill, police would have to notify the school whenever they arrest a student for a violent crime before the next school day begins. School administrators would have to notify the student’s teachers as soon as possible.

Teachers could ask school boards to suspend students if administrators won’t do it. They would also have the right to inspect a student’s behavioral records and end their contracts without penalty if students attack them. Administrators would have to report any violent incident perpetrated by a student to police.

Opponents say will only put more children in jail.


8:25 a.m.

A legislative committee is set to take public comments on a Republican bill that would relax juvenile criminal record confidentiality.

Wisconsin juvenile criminal records are automatically sealed right now. Under the bill, police would have to notify the school whenever they arrest a student for a violent crime before the next school day begins. School administrators would have to notify the student’s teachers as soon as possible.

Teachers could ask school boards to suspend students if administrators won’t do it. They would also have the right to inspect a student’s behavioral records and end their contracts without penalty if students attack them.

The Assembly Judiciary Committee has scheduled a public hearing on the bill for Thursday. Sixteen groups have registered in opposition. No groups have registered in support.