Column: Pigeon Roost incident marked height of state’s frontier violence


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On Sept. 3, 1812, a Native American war party killed more than 20 settlers living in a wooded outpost near present-day Scottsburg, about 25 miles south of Seymour.

Motivated by bounties offered by the British, the perpetrators scalped women and children, torched their log cabins and left the village in ashes.

The Massacre at Pigeon Roost is the most notorious example of frontier violence in Indiana history. To this day, it is shrouded in mystery. As the Indiana Historical Bureau notes, “There are many accounts of this tragedy in which the actions and specific numbers killed vary.”

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