Funny money puzzles police: Information from public could solve counterfeit cases


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Submitted photo / Video of a woman who recently passed a counterfeit $100 bill at Circle K at Main and Commerce streets in Brownstown.


Police have asked for the public’s help in solving at least 18 cases involving counterfeit $20 bills and $100 bills being passed in the area.

“Our investigations have led to several persons of interest,” Detective C.J. Foster of Seymour Police Department said.

Those people include a woman recently caught on video who passed a counterfeit $100 bill at the Circle K at Main and Commerce streets in Brownstown, he said Thursday.

Foster said he is working with Detective Rick Blaker Jr. with the sheriff’s department to solve the cases. The FBI also has been involved in the search for those passing the counterfeit bills.

Foster said police also are looking for three other

individuals, two men and a woman, who are people of

interest in the counterfeiting cases.

The most recent incident of counterfeit money being passed was received by Seymour police on Tuesday.

That report of people in an aqua-green minivan attempting to pass a counterfeit $20 bill came in from a Circle K store at 2119 E. Tipton St.

On Saturday morning, Seymour police also received a report of a counterfeit $20 bill at Dollar General Store, 1111 W. Tipton St., and the day before a counterfeit $20 bill was taken to the police station. That bill had reportedly been passed at one of the local Subway sandwich stores.

Police are asking anyone who might have information regarding the counterfeit money to call Seymour Police Department, Jackson County Sheriff’s Department or Brownstown Police Department.

Sheriff Michael Carothers earlier said the public should be careful with cash transactions and should examine bills to make sure they have security strips.

Those strips can be seen by holding a bill up to a light. The security strip on a $20 bill will repeatedly say “USA TWENTY,” for instance. The strips are not on $1 bills.

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